No, you don’t have to wear a mask when driving

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No, you don’t have to wear a mask when driving

Picture: iStock

People have been panic shopping for client items and meals – regardless of calls not to – and sharing unchecked or pretend information on social media.

As the novel coronavirus spreads, so does pretend information, rumours, hoaxes and false paperwork.

Following President Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement of a 21-day lockdown, folks have been panic shopping for client items and meals – regardless of calls not to – and sharing unchecked or pretend information on social media.

This previous week, there have been claims starting from helicopters spraying disinfectant, to a social media publish that mentioned authorities would solely help firms that had been 51% black-owned.

A doc of unknown origin has been quickly shared by South Africans by which it’s claimed, amongst different issues, that just one individual will likely be allowed per car, and, ought to there be a passenger, that individual ought to sit within the again seat. Both ought to wear masks, the doc claims.

The doc, which has no reference or context, additional claims that folks is not going to be permitted to journey to second residences.

While it seems to include data relating to a lockdown, it doesn’t apply to South Africa.

Government Communication and Information System spokesperson Chrispin Phiri confirmed that the doc was pretend.

Kate Wilkinson, deputy chief editor at Africa Check, additionally instructed Information24 that the doc was pretend.

“It’s troublesome in a time like this as a result of we are able to’t fact-check the whole lot. People want to begin altering how they suppose and react to the data they obtain,” she mentioned.

“We have to acknowledge that individuals are scared, however we are able to ensure that that concern doesn’t have an effect on the choices they make, and that features the data that they share. If you obtain a message on WhatsApp or you see one thing on Facebook in regards to the novel coronavirus, don’t share it if you’re not 100% positive that it’s correct.

“Sharing false data can mislead folks. We’re speaking about folks’s well being – all our selections about our well being ought to be based mostly on correct data.”

Wilkinson mentioned folks might report suspicious messages or data to Africa Check by way of Twitter, or obtain a free message each Friday known as “What’s Crap on WhatsApp?” by sending a message to 082 709 3527.

For extra information your method, Orignaly Published on https://citizen.co.za  and 

live at 2020-03-24 15:56:23

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